Society of the Institute for Contemporary Psychotherapy

SICP Lectures Series 2020-2021:

For more information about SICP’s lectures, please visit http://sicplectureseries.blogspot.com/

Note: All lectures are Friday nights, from 7:00 – 9:00 pm. At this time, all lectures will be held virtually via Zoom.

If you have questions about SICP lectures, contact Barbara Bolas, PhD, at sicp.lectures.barbara@gmail.com

SICP Lecture with Tony Bass, PhD
Friday, March 5, 2021
Time: 7:00pm – 9:00pm

SICP Lecture with Jody Messler Davies, PhD
Friday, May 7, 2021
Time: 7:00pm – 9:00pm

Please check back soon for registration!

 

Past Lectures:

Nov 22: The Interpersonal Play of Resilience and Despair with Holly Levenkron

Friday, November 22, 2019
The Interpersonal Play of “Resilience and Despair”
Living in between the paranoid/schizoid and depressive positions

with Holly Levenkron, LCSW, LICSW

In this presentation, I will highlight the central role of affect in the body as fundamental to movement in the patient’s and analyst’s psychic collapse and vitalization. I’ll consider somatic reverie as it influences voice, containment and affective honesty in tolerating uncertainty and anxiety in the intersubjective field.

Bion’s breakthrough was to see Klein’s paranoid-schizoid position through a relational lens, in an oscillating field.  A major contribution was to see how the body/mind system didn’t stand in static positions but, as Ogden described, was in dialectic movement, PS<=>D. I’m suggesting this oscillation or dialectic offers a transformative potential that can help negotiate uncertainty through somatic reverie on the affective level.

Elaborating on aspects of theory from Bion, and Winnicott, I’ll present work with a patient that included somatic manifestations, where dissociation/depersonalization was a central defense against disintegration. For this patient, what felt like the safety of solid ground suddenly would go dark leaving patient and analyst with varying degrees of fear, anger and shame. How can we think about analytic movement occurring during such sudden shared pulls in the field? In discussing this patient’s treatment I draw on Field Theory and include Winnicott’s ideas about transformation, especially focusing on the aspect of the developmental process he termed “personalization”. He suggests an integration of emotionality in the body/skin (soma) with the mind (psyche) that he called the “psyche-soma”. This integration marked the dawning of the intersubjective capacity to take in and hold affective content from the other. I will look at the unlinking of the “psyche-soma”, the separation of the mind-body system, (Gordon and Corrigan) in a paranoid schizoid process. I will consider the fluctuation between “personalization” and rapid “disintegration” in a patient who suffered from gripping panic attacks and further discuss how these concepts apply to our general psychoanalytic work.

Holly Levenkron, LCSW, LICSW received her training in psychoanalysis at ICP, the Institute for Contemporary Psychotherapy in NYC where she is a faculty member and supervisor as well as Director of the Psychoanalytic Training Program.  She also is faculty and supervising analyst at MIP, the Massachusetts Institute for Psychoanalysis. For many years she has been teaching Relational Theory, with a special interest in enactment, dissociation, affect and Comparative Field Theory, the latter which she taught as part of a 6 week Zoom seminar this Fall for the Australian branch of the IARPP. She has published in Psychoanalytic Inquiry and Contemporary Psychoanalysis and has presented at numerous conferences both nationally and internationally. In addition to her work in Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy, she specializes in working with Couples and with Adult Autism (Asperger’s Syndrome).  She maintains a private practice in New York City and Cambridge, MA.

Jan 24: Reflections on Therapeutic Action: The Role of Hierarchy, Analysts' Self-Interest and the Limitations of Insight and Interpretation with Irwin Hirsch, PhD

Friday, January 24, 2020
Reflections on Therapeutic Action: The Role of Hierarchy, Analysts’ Self-Interest and the Limitations of Insight and Interpretation
with Irwin Hirsch, PhD

Insights and emotional understanding that are based on analysts’ genetic interpretations have long been thought of as the heart of mutative action. Without devaluing the importance of insight, recent generations of analysts have placed more emphasis on the therapeutic effects of the patient-therapist relationship per se. That is, a newer version of the analytic ideal emphasizes patients’ internalization of the analytic relationship as potentially creating a richer internalization than those originating with one’s earlier familial introjects. More specifically, effective therapeutic outcome depends on the analytic relationship evolving into one that differs from earlier significant relationships. I argue that optimal therapeutic outcomes depend largely on how therapists use their countertransference experience. In particular, I suggest that excessive analytic hierarchy and analysts’ willingness to choose comfortable self-interest in relating to patients while avoiding disquieting countertransference themes are largely responsible for disappointing outcomes.

Irwin Hirsch, PhD is distinguished visiting faculty, William Alanson White Institute; faculty, supervisor and former director, Manhattan Institute for Psychoanalysis; adjunct clinical professor of psychology and supervisor, Postdoctoral Program in Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis, New York University; and faculty &amp; supervisor, The National Training Program, The National Institute of the Psychotherapies.

He is author of over 80 psychoanalytic articles and book chapters and 4 books: the 2008 Goethe Award winning, “Coasting in the Countertransference: Conflicts of Self-Interest between Analyst and Patient”, Routledge;  “The Interpersonal Tradition: The Origins of Psychoanalytic Subjectivity”, Routledge, 2015; co-edited with Donnel Stern,“The Interpersonal Perspective in Psychoanalysis,1960’s – 1990’s: Rethinking Transference and Countertransference”, Routledge, 2017 and also co edited with Donnel Stern, “Further Developments in Interpersonal Psychoanalysis, 1980s-2010s: Evolving Interest in the Analyst’s Subjectivity. Routledge, 2018.

 


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About SICP

SICP is the professional society of ICP, The Institute for Contemporary Psychotherapy, a New York State not-for-profit corporation with offices at 33 West 60th Street, New York, NY.

SICP sponsors educational activities that further professional discourse within ICP as well as in the broader psychoanalytic community.

The SICP Lecture Series is an annual series of four lectures on topics of interest to the psychoanalytic and psychotherapeutic community, including The Schwartz Memorial Lecture, which is co-sponsored by The Institute for Contemporary Psychotherapy.

In addition, each year SICP hosts ‘SICP Weekend,’ a weekend-long retreat comprised of several lectures as well as additional opportunities for learning, networking and connection.


Join SICP

$50 regular
$25 current trainee
SICP membership runs from January 1st through December 31st.
 
Please note: 2019 ICP graduates receive complimentary membership! Please email us at robinmathewslcsw@gmail.com to register your membership with SICP.
 
For SICP Membership, mail a check made out to “SICP” to:
Robin Mathews, SICP Treasurer
1449 Lexington Avenue, Suite 4A
NY, NY 10128
 

 

Continuing Education Information

NYS Continuing Education Information

*The Institute for Contemporary Psychotherapy is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed psychoanalysts.

*The Institute for Contemporary Psychotherapy is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Social Work as an approved provider of continuing education credit for licensed social workers.

*The Institute for Contemporary Psychotherapy is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed mental health counselors.

*The Institute for Contemporary Psychotherapy is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed marriage and family therapists.

*The Institute for Contemporary Psychotherapy is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists.