2012-2013 Recordings

You can purchase any of the following webinar recordings for $25.

The New Relationship for Today’s Dysregulated Patient

About the Speaker

Dr. Ron Taffel is Chair of the Institute for Contemporary Psychotherapy in New York City. He is the author of eight books and over a hundred articles on psychotherapy, contemporary family life, adolescents and young adulthood. Dr. Taffel has done professional and parent workshops nationwide, training thousands of clinicians in teaching institutes, community agencies and private practice. His presentations have been featured in The New York Times and numerous TV and radio programs including NPR, 20/20 and Dateline, as well as The Today Show, Good Morning America and Larry King Live.

About the Topic

In a 21st century world, patients need a different kind of treatment connection. This workshop is about the new therapy relationship that regardless of one’s approach is essential for clinicians who treat eating disorders, as well as dissociative and behavioral acting-out, anxiety /affective disorders and other self-regulatory issues. Because of massive changes in the family, human development and social-technological context no clinical orientation can succeed without a relationship both attuned to new realities and compelling enough to get through the din of psyche and everyday life. After all, ‘post-boomers’ (born after 1980) have a different definition of dangerous and ordinary, focus and distraction, the boundary between internal and external, the experience of autonomy and connection – than most clinicians were trained to deal with. Using case examples representing various types of dysregulation, Ron will present key components for building such a relationship, one that fosters our patients’ ability to hear us as well as themselves, to hold us between sessions, and to more effectively co-regulate through the therapy connection.

Matters of Life and Death: Suicide and Eating Disorders

About the Speakers

Dr. Mary Bartlett earned her doctorate from Auburn University and is an independent consultant, suicidologist, and international speaker. She is the Vice- President of Behavioral Sciences at Cape Fox Professional Services, and formerly served as the Suicide Prevention and Risk Consultant to a national treatment center for eating disorders. With 15 years clinical and teaching experience, she is an authorized trainer for the American Association of Suicidology and the Suicide Prevention Resource Center, and is a qualified master resilience trainer. She and Dr. Nicole Siegfried are investigators on a current research study with Dr. Thomas Joiner examining risk factors of suicidality in eating disorders. Dr. Bartlett is a member of the Academy of Eating Disorders and the National Eating Disorders Association, and serves on the International Association of Eating Disorders Ethics Committee. Dr. Nicole Siegfried is a licensed clinical psychologist and Certified Eating Disorder Specialist, currently employed at the Birmingham VA Medical Center. She is a co-Founder and former Clinical Director of Magnolia Creek Treatment Center for Eating Disorders. Having served as an Associate Professor of Psychology at Samford University from 2001-2008, she is currently an Adjunct Assistant Professor at UAB. Dr. Siegfried is an international speaker and has published research, magazine articles, and book chapters in the field of eating disorders. She and Dr. Mary Bartlett are investigators on a current research study with Dr. Thomas Joiner examining risk factors of suicidality in eating disorders. Dr. Siegfried is a member of the Academy of Eating Disorders, Co-Chair of the Eating Disorders and Suicide AED Special Interest Group, a member of the Residential Eating Disorder Coalition (RED-C), and chair of the RED-C Research Committee.

About the Topic

Research has demonstrated high suicide rates in eating disorders. In fact, some studies have indicated that the high mortality rate in anorexia is more a function of suicidality than of a compromised medical status. Individuals with eating disorders may be at particular risk for suicide based on their unique experience of the combination of perceived burdensomeness, isolation, and capacity to engage in a lethal act. Despite the high prevalence of suicide in eating disorders, suicidality is under-researched in this population, and consequently, not well understood. The majority of practitioners have had less than two hours of training in suicide, and fifty percent fail to ask about and adequately assess suicidal ideation. Because suicidality is so common in eating disorders, eating disorder professionals need to be better equipped than the general therapist in treating these symptoms and related behaviors. This webinar will provide participants with a journey into the suicidal mind as it pertains to clients with eating disorders. Instruction on suicide risk assessment, suicidal crisis interventions, documentation guidelines, and evidencebased and practical treatments will be discussed.

What about Us? Countertransference (and Transference) in working with clients with eating disorders

About the Speaker

F. Diane Barth, LCSW, is a psychotherapist and psychoanalyst in private practice in New York City. She works with adults and adolescents, individuals and families and has been working with college students with eating disorders since 1981. She received a master’s degree from Columbia University School of Social Work and analytic certification from the Psychoanalytic Institute of the Postgraduate Center. Her articles have been published in the Clinical Social Work Journal, Psychoanalytic Dialogues, Psychoanalytic Psychology, and other professional journals, and as chapters in numerous books. Her book, Daydreaming: Unlock the Creative Power of Your Mind, was published by Viking/Penguin. She runs private study groups in New York City and workshops for therapists around the country and has taught several online courses. Her blog “Off the Couch” can be found at psychologytoday.com. She is also the Editor of the Special Edition of The Clinical Social Work Journal on “Integrating Theories in Clinical Social Work” June 2011.

About the Topic

Clients suffering from eating disorders can be difficult to work with, and their symptoms difficult to treat. Therapist’s reactions to the symptoms can range from identification, rescue fantasies, sympathy and even pity to a sense of helplessness and hopelessness to frustration and irritation to self-blame and feelings of incompetence as a therapist. All of these and other countertransference reactions can interfere with the therapeutic work; but they can also provide important and useful information about what is going on in a client’s internal world. In this webinar F. Diane Barth, LCSW, who has been working with and writing about eating disorders since 1981, will discuss some common countertransference responses to these symptoms. Using clinical material, she will illustrate some ways that a clinician can make use of these reactions in the therapeutic process – sometimes by directly addressing unarticulated material and sometimes by shifting the therapeutic prism slightly, to shed light on a different aspect of the therapeutic work.

Conceptual and Practical DBT Strategies in the Treatment of Complex Eating Disorder Patients

About the Speaker

Lucene Wisniewski, PhD, FAED is Clinical Director and co-founder of the Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders and is an Adjunct Assistant Professor of Psychological Sciences at Case Western Reserve University. Her research and clinical interests include using empirically founded treatments to inform clinical programs. She provides workshops on the CBT and DBT treatment of eating disorders internationally and publishes in peer reviewed journals as well as invited book chapters. Dr. Wisniewski has been elected fellow and has served on the board of directors of the Academy for Eating Disorders; she currently is co-leader of AEDs Borderline Personality Disorder special interest group.

About the Topic

Patients for whom traditional treatments have not resulted in recovery/remission as well as those who suffer from multiple Axis I and II diagnoses tend to be a conceptual and practical treatment conundrum, often leading to therapist burnout and to patient drop out. Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT), originally designed to treat chronically suicidal patients suffering from Borderline Personality Disorder, is a treatment that has been applied to multidiagnostic, difficult-to-treat patients such as these. DBT offers strategies to address prioritizing multiple treatment targets, including those that can be life threatening in patient with eating disorders as well as prioritizing behaviors that can interfere with treatment and subsequently contribute to patient drop out and therapist burn out. Via didactic and case presentations, participants will be exposed to DBT skills and treatment strategies as they are applied to ED symptomology. Following the training, participants will be able to:- Identify multiple treatment targets within a DBT Framework- Identify which ED behaviors may be considered therapy interfering- Be aware of research on DBT and EDs

Integrating Cognitive Therapy with Eating Disorders

About the Speaker

Wayne Bowers is Full Clinical Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Iowa and former Director of the Eating Disorder Program. His current duties are principally clinical in nature working within the eating disorders program as a group and individual therapist across a continum of care that includes inpatient, partial hospital and outpatient treatment. Dr. Bowers has been working with adults and adolescents suffering from eating disorders 1977. Dr. Bowers also in involved in the education of psychistry residents primarily in the area of psychotherapy. He has written a book chapters, review and research articles with a emphasis on treating eating disorders on an inpatient and partial hospitall level. Addtionally, he is engaged in small research projects related to clinical outcomes. He was trained in the use of Cognitive Therapy at the Center for Cognitive Therapy working with Aaron Beck and Brian Shaw. Dr. Bowers will look at aspects of Research-Practice Integration. He will briefly review terms related to the problems with research-practice and how professionals look at the importance of research-practice. There will be a focus on the the use of evidence based practice and how this can be integrated into research-practice. Finally, there will be a discussion of the AED’s work on research-practice integration and some ideas of how both researchers and practitioners can cooperate and enhance the process of research-practice integration.

About the Topic

Dr. Bowers will look at aspects of Research-Practice Integration. He will briefly review terms related to the problems with research-practice and how professionals look at the importance of research-practice. There will be a focus on the use of evidence based practice and how this can be integrated into researchpractice. Finally, there will be a discussion of the AED’s work on research-practice integration and some ideas of how both researchers and practitioners can cooperate and enhance the process of research-practice integration.

Eating Disorders and Co-Morbidities: The Treatment of Eating Disorders in the Context of Anxiety, Depression, Trauma, Substance Abuse and Other Medical and Psychiatric Issues (Session 2)

About the Speakers

Dr. Joan Lavender is a clinical psychologist and contemporary relational psychoanalytic psychotherapist with extensive experience as a clinician, supervisor, and author. Her earliest training in nonverbal behavior and Gendlin’s experiential theory serves as a unique perspective that integrates all of her work. She is a graduate of the Institute for Contemporary Psychotherapy and a past Postdoctoral Fellow in psychotherapy research at S.U.N.Y. She is a former Director at the Renfrew Center of New York where she designed intensive milieu treatment for the eating disordered patients. Her enthusiasm for working as part of a treatment team grew out of her work with people with severe personality disorders. She has written on loneliness, envy, body image, eating disorders and the relationship between movement behavior and symbolization. Joan is in private practice in New York City.
Melainie Rogers, MS, RD is a registered dietitian and founder of Melainie Rogers Nutrition LLC, a private group nutrition counseling practice in Manhattan, New York. She is also the founder and executive director of BALANCE eating disorder treatment center™. Her specialties include eating disorders, weight management and gastric bypass surgery counseling. Seeing a need for more services in New York City, Melainie has expanded her counseling practice with BALANCE eating disorder treatment center™ which offers an Intensive Outpatient Program (IOP), Saturday IOP, and a Day Treatment Program. It is her hope and desire to better serve the needs of our clients who suffer with eating disorders and disordered eating, to help them find relief from their symptoms, and a better life balance in their recovery. Melainie received her Bachelor’s degree in Biochemistry from Melbourne University and a Graduate Diploma in Sports Nutrition from Deakin University, Australia. Her Master of Science Degree in Clinical Nutrition was obtained from New York University. Melainie completed a rigorous internship in clinical nutrition at New York University Medical Center. She worked extensively in obesity research at the St Luke’s / Roosevelt Obesity Research Center, developed the nutrition component of the Beth Israel Medical Center weight loss surgery program, and counseled clients for weight management, and eating disorders with Joy Bauer Nutrition before establishing her own private practice and eating disorder treatment center. She is the current President of the International Association of Eating Disorder Professionals (iaedp), NYC Chapter, and Chapter Representative on the National (iaedp) Executive Board.
Dr. Karen Rosewater is a graduate of Yale University and the Yale University School of Medicine. She completed her residency in pediatrics at Boston Children’s HospitalHarvard Medical School, and a fellowship in adolescent medicine at Boston Children’s and Children’s National Medical Center in Washington, D.C., and received a Masters in Public Health from George Washington University. Since finishing her fellowship, Dr. Rosewater has been working as a physician in a private practice, AYAM (Adolescent-Young Adult Medicine) in New York City where she cares for pre-teens, teenagers and young adults providing primary care and specialized care, including the treatment of eating disorders. Dr. Rosewater is the recipient of several prestigious honors, including membership in the AOA Medical Honor Society, and for outstanding work in research, teaching and community service. She is on the advisory boards of the Center for the Study of Anorexia and Bulimia (CSAB), the New York Chapter of IAEDP (International Association of Eating Disorder Professionals) and the Churchill School, and previously served a term on the advisory board of the Renfrew Center of New York and is a member of the Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine (SAHM).
Dr. Carol Zale holds a BA with honors in Literature from the University of Pennsylvania, a Post Baccalaureate Premedical Certificate from Columbia University and an M.D. from The Mount Sinai School of Medicine. She completed her psychiatry residency at Mount Sinai as well as an NIMH-funded clinical research fellowship in the psychopharmacology of mood and personality disorders. While a fellow, Dr. Zale also consulted regularly on the care of individuals with serious psychiatric illness and a history of violent offenses at the Pilgrim State Psychiatric Hospital. As an Attending Physician in the outpatient psychiatry program at Mount Sinai, Dr. Zale she was both a clinician utilizing the split care model of treatment and a clinic supervisor of psychiatry residents. In 1997 Dr. Zale opened her private practice in psychotherapy and psychopharmacology in New York City, where she treats late adolescents and adults who have a variety of psychiatric and medical issues, including those of eating disorders. Dr. Zale greatly enjoys teaching and mentoring others. At Mount Sinai she co-taught an elective for medical students in Medicine in Literature, and she developed and taught a course in Psychopharmacology for the nonM.D. Therapist at the Institute for Contemporary Psychotherapy (ICP). She has also taught candidates at the Center for the study of Anorexia and Bulimia (CSAB) on the psychiatrist’s role in treating eating disorders and has taught as well on the topic of suicide. Dr. Zale’s other professional activities include mentoring graduating psychiatrists who wish to start their own private practice in psychiatry as a volunteer for the Medical Society of the State of New York, member of the Advisory Board for CSAB, and she has previously served on the boards of Caring at Columbia and the Zale Foundation. She is the recipient of a Ralph Kaufman prize in Psychiatry at Mount Sinai, Spotlight Award at Mount Sinai and a Red Cross award of distinction. Dr. Zale is the author of several publications in her field as well as being a published poet.

About the Topic

“How many times while treating a patient with an eating disorder has we wondered why progress has stalled? It is critical to understand what is going on “beneath the surface” in order to not put unrealistic expectations on our patients. Today our team will be discussing the ways each member brings a different perspective to the decision-making about clinical questions such as new onset substance abuse, considerations in the treatment of trauma patients, working with the pregnant patient, and how one might address the unintentionally undermining behavior of family members.”

Eating Disorders and Co-Morbidities: The Treatment of Eating Disorders (Session 1)

About the Speakers

Dr. Joan Lavender is a clinical psychologist and contemporary relational psychoanalytic psychotherapist with extensive experience as a clinician, supervisor, and author. Her earliest training in nonverbal behavior and Gendlin’s experiential theory serves as a unique perspective that integrates all of her work. She is a graduate of the Institute for Contemporary Psychotherapy and a past Postdoctoral Fellow in psychotherapy research at S.U.N.Y. She is a former Director at the Renfrew Center of New York where she designed intensive milieu treatment for the eating disordered patients. Her enthusiasm for working as part of a treatment team grew out of her work with people with severe personality disorders. She has written on loneliness, envy, body image, eating disorders and the relationship between movement behavior and symbolization. Joan is in private practice in New York City.
Melainie Rogers, MS, RD is a registered dietitian and founder of Melainie Rogers Nutrition LLC, a private group nutrition counseling practice in Manhattan, New York. She is also the founder and executive director of BALANCE eating disorder treatment center™. Her specialties include eating disorders, weight management and gastric bypass surgery counseling. Seeing a need for more services in New York City, Melainie has expanded her counseling practice with BALANCE eating disorder treatment center™ which offers an Intensive Outpatient Program (IOP), Saturday IOP, and a Day Treatment Program. It is her hope and desire to better serve the needs of our clients who suffer with eating disorders and disordered eating, to help them find relief from their symptoms, and a better life balance in their recovery. Melainie received her Bachelor’s degree in Biochemistry from Melbourne University and a Graduate Diploma in Sports Nutrition from Deakin University, Australia. Her Master of Science Degree in Clinical Nutrition was obtained from New York University. Melainie completed a rigorous internship in clinical nutrition at New York University Medical Center. She worked extensively in obesity research at the St Luke’s / Roosevelt Obesity Research Center, developed the nutrition component of the Beth Israel Medical Center weight loss surgery program, and counseled clients for weight management, and eating disorders with Joy Bauer Nutrition before establishing her own private practice and eating disorder treatment center. She is the current President of the International Association of Eating Disorder Professionals (iaedp), NYC Chapter, and Chapter Representative on the National (iaedp) Executive Board.
Dr. Karen Rosewater is a graduate of Yale University and the Yale University School of Medicine. She completed her residency in pediatrics at Boston Children’s HospitalHarvard Medical School, and a fellowship in adolescent medicine at Boston Children’s and Children’s National Medical Center in Washington, D.C., and received a Masters in Public Health from George Washington University. Since finishing her fellowship, Dr. Rosewater has been working as a physician in a private practice, AYAM (Adolescent-Young Adult Medicine) in New York City where she cares for pre-teens, teenagers and young adults providing primary care and specialized care, including the treatment of eating disorders. Dr. Rosewater is the recipient of several prestigious honors, including membership in the AOA Medical Honor Society, and for outstanding work in research, teaching and community service. She is on the advisory boards of the Center for the Study of Anorexia and Bulimia (CSAB), the New York Chapter of IAEDP (International Association of Eating Disorder Professionals) and the Churchill School, and previously served a term on the advisory board of the Renfrew Center of New York and is a member of the Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine (SAHM).
Dr. Carol Zale holds a BA with honors in Literature from the University of Pennsylvania, a Post Baccalaureate Premedical Certificate from Columbia University and an M.D. from The Mount Sinai School of Medicine. She completed her psychiatry residency at Mount Sinai as well as an NIMH-funded clinical research fellowship in the psychopharmacology of mood and personality disorders. While a fellow, Dr. Zale also consulted regularly on the care of individuals with serious psychiatric illness and a history of violent offenses at the Pilgrim State Psychiatric Hospital. As an Attending Physician in the outpatient psychiatry program at Mount Sinai, Dr. Zale she was both a clinician utilizing the split care model of treatment and a clinic supervisor of psychiatry residents. In 1997 Dr. Zale opened her private practice in psychotherapy and psychopharmacology in New York City, where she treats late adolescents and adults who have a variety of psychiatric and medical issues, including those of eating disorders. Dr. Zale greatly enjoys teaching and mentoring others. At Mount Sinai she co-taught an elective for medical students in Medicine in Literature, and she developed and taught a course in Psychopharmacology for the nonM.D. Therapist at the Institute for Contemporary Psychotherapy (ICP). She has also taught candidates at the Center for the study of Anorexia and Bulimia (CSAB) on the psychiatrist’s role in treating eating disorders and has taught as well on the topic of suicide. Dr. Zale’s other professional activities include mentoring graduating psychiatrists who wish to start their own private practice in psychiatry as a volunteer for the Medical Society of the State of New York, member of the Advisory Board for CSAB, and she has previously served on the boards of Caring at Columbia and the Zale Foundation. She is the recipient of a Ralph Kaufman prize in Psychiatry at Mount Sinai, Spotlight Award at Mount Sinai and a Red Cross award of distinction. Dr. Zale is the author of several publications in her field as well as being a published poet.

About the Topic

“Each person who sits across from us hoping for help with an eating disorder is much more than her set of symptoms. Her eating issues live within the context of her personality underpinnings, temperament, talents, struggles and unique life history. In this webinar, we will help you to identify your eating disorder patient within the larger context of her personality and give you suggestions of ways we have found to be helpful with the work. This “going below the surface” will teach you how to establish rapport with patients who present in these different ways, to see patterns along with symptoms, and to formulate realistic goals and expectations. Once you have an essential understanding of personality disorder it will help you to anticipate high risk periods throughout the life cycle of your patient while keeping the therapy relationship strong so that your patient can continue to grow in the context of new challenges. Our format will include case materials, theory and practice.”

Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Eating Disorders (CBT-E)

About the Speaker

 Dr. Hildebrandt graduated with a degree in psychology from Vanderbilt University in 2000 and completed his doctorate in Clinical Psychology in 2005 from Rutgers University. He obtained a concentration in Sport Psychology. After completing his graduate degree, he began his postdoctoral training at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine working in the Eating and Weight Disorders Program. In 2008, he became an Assistant Professor and took over as Director of the Eating and Weight Disorders Program. His clinical and research interests have remained focused on the development, maintenance, and treatment of appearance and performance enhancing drug abuse. Other clinical and research interests include treatment of females with alcohol use disorders, gender differences in the eating and weight disorders, and the neuroendocrinology of these disease states. He has received grants from the National Institute of Drug Abuse, National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, and National Institute of Mental Health, and National Institute on Child Health and Human Development and maintains an outpatient clinic servicing these populations across the lifespan. He is an active clinician, specializing in cognitive behavior therapy, couples therapy, and family based therapy for these disorders.

About the Topic

“Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and its updated version Cognitive Behavioral Therapy-Enhanced involve targeting of core behavioral disturbances (i.e. binge eating, purging, restriction, body checking/avoidance etc.) and relevant disturbances in cognition that support these disturbances. This lecture will provide a practical overview of how to use these strategies successfully with eating disorder patients in the context of individual psychotherapy and how to build a successful treatment plan based on a range of presenting problems. The discussion will be primarily focused on the applied nature of these interventions and how to use them with patients that have difficulty engaging in these fundamental aspects of treatment.”

The Weight-Bearing Years: Eating Disorders and Body Image Despair in Adult Women

About the Speaker

Dr. Margo Maine, cofounder of the Maine & Weinstein Specialty Group, is a clinical psychologist who has specialized in eating disorders and related issues for over 30 years. She is the author of “Treatment of Eating Disorders: Bridging the Research- Practice Gap,” coedited with Beth McGilley and Doug Bunnell (Elsevier, 2010); “Effective Clinical Practice in the Treatment of Eating Disorders: The Heart of the Matter,” co-edited with William Davis and Jane Shure (Routledge, 2009); “The Body Myth: Adult Women and the Pressure to Be Perfect” with (Joe Kelly, John Wiley, 2005); “Father Hunger: Fathers, Daughters and the Pursuit of Thinness” (Gurze, 2004); and “Body Wars: Making Peace With Women’s Bodies” (Gurze, 2000). She is also a senior editor of Eating Disorders: The Journal of Treatment and Prevention. Dr. Maine was a founding member and longtime board member and vice president of the Eating Disorders Coalition for Research, Policy, and Action, a Founding Member and Fellow of the Academy for Eating Disorders, and a member of the Founder’s Council and past president of the National Eating Disorders Association. She is a member of the psychiatry departments at the Institute of Living/Hartford Hospital’s Mental Health Network and at Connecticut Children’s Medical Center, having previously directed their eating disorder programs. Dr Maine is the 2007 recipient of The Lori Irving Award for Excellence in Eating Disorders Awareness and Prevention, given by the National Eating Disorders Association. She lectures nationally and internationally on topics related to the treatment and prevention of eating disorders, female development, and women’s health.

About the Topic

“Increasing numbers of adult women now suffer from clinical and subclinical eating disorders, despite prevailing beliefs that these conditions only affect the young. Misguided beliefs about who is at risk to develop eating disorders have created a bias shared by professionals as well as the public. As a result, many adults are not identified or helped and the costs in personal suffering and to the public health are staggering. Traditionally, researchers found that women’s satisfaction with their bodies increased during the middle years as women shifted their focus from their body’s appearance to its function. However, recent studies find that 75% of American women, aged 25-45, report disordered eating and body image dissatisfaction, with 10% meeting criteria for clinical eating disorders, and 65 percent of midlife woman dissatisfied with their body and weight. Comparable levels of dieting and disordered eating are now found across young and elderly women, although moderate weight gain in midlife is associated with health and longevity Contemporary women experience unprecedented attention to their bodies and appearance and relentless media images of bodies sculpted to perfection. The multiple role transitions and losses of adulthood also lead women to revert to focusing on the body as a misguided way to deal with aging and other life issues. The “war on obesity” and the misinformation promulgated by the diet industry intensify many women’s concerns about health at and beyond midlife; further contributing to restrictive dieting that may lead to full eating disorders. This workshop summarizes the data available regarding the extent of eating disorders, body image distress, and disordered eating in adult women. While adults share many issues with younger patients, critical differences will be discussed. Case material, unique clinical issues, and implications for professional training, outreach, prevention, and policy will also be discussed.”

Eat, Shop, and Be Merry? Compulsive Buying and Eating Disorders

About the Speaker

 April Lane Benson, Ph.D., is a nationally known psychologist who specializes in the treatment of compulsive buying disorder. She co-founded the Center for the Study of Anorexia and Bulimia and serves on the Board of the Institute for Contemporary Psychotherapy, both in New York. She’s been in private practice in New York City for more than 30 years. Dr. Benson edited the first multidisciplinary examination of her subject, I Shop, Therefore I Am: Compulsive Buying and the Search for Self (Aronson, 2000). Her second book, To Buy or Not to Buy: Why We Overshop and How to Stop (Trumpeter, 2008), offers a comprehensive program for stopping overshopping. Dr. Benson has published widely in professional books and magazines, appears regularly in the media, and speaks to both professional and non-professional audiences. She’s recently conducted empirical research on the efficacy of the Stopping Overshopping treatment model and the results will be published in the Journal of Groups in Addiction and Recovery in 2013. Offering individual treatment and group coaching, both in person on the telephone and via Skype, Dr. Benson also trains therapists who want to work with overshoppers. For details about training, go to http://www.shopaholicnomore.com/for-therapists/. Stopping Overshopping, LLC, maintains an active and informative website that includes a comprehensive resource center, a blog, and a press kit; the site http://www.shopaholicnomore.com/ is visited by people from some 80 countries each month.

About the Topic

“Dieting and shopping have been traditional, tried, and true ways that women have negotiated the ups and downs of life. As we know only too well, both of these behaviors can run amok and leave great suffering in their wake. Both behaviors can be enacted simultaneously or, somewhat more likely, one will predominate for a period of time and then the other will take over. This seesawing will continue unless we help patients strengthen the underlying muscles that will enable them to resist both forms of self-defeating behavior. In the webinar, we’ll look at what the research has shown about the relationship between eating disorders and compulsive buying disorder and focus on a few highly effective techniques that I use with overshoppers that could be just as successful with patients with eating disorders.”

Trauma and Eating Disorders: Part II

About the Speaker

Susan Schulherr, LCSW, a licensed clinical social worker, has lived and worked in New York City for over 30 years. In her private psychotherapy practice she has treated people with eating disorders and other problems of weight and eating for the last two decades. She has also provided extensive supervision and training for other clinicians. Susan is the author of the extremely well-received Eating Disorders for Dummies (Wiley, 2008). Her chapter on treating binge eating disorder appears in the 2005 book, EMDR Solutions: Pathways to Healing (Norton). Her article, “The Binge/Diet Cycle: Shedding New Light, Finding New Exits,” was published in Eating Disorders: The Journal of Treatment and Prevention (1998). Susan has presented workshops on eating disorders at the local and national levels. She has spoken extensively on various topics related to weight and eating to both professional and nonprofessional audiences. Susan graduated with honors from the University of Chicago and received a social work master’s degree from Columbia University. She was trained in the treatment of families and couples by Salvador Minuchin, MD, and received certification from his training institute. She also studied at the Center for the Study of Anorexia and Bulimia in New York City. Susan has extensive experience in the trauma specialty approaches of EMDR and Somatic experiencing, each of which she has adapted for the treatment of eating disorders.

About the Topic

“The Trauma-Wise Therapist,” Susan will take us right into the trenches with our traumatized eating disorder clients. There, you’ll discover why the body is a critical focus for unresolved trauma. You’ll learn how to identify the presence of trauma in your clients by attending to: 1) visible clues from the client’s nervous system, and 2) trauma-coded relationship patterns. You’ll find out specific ways you can use this information with your clients on a day-to-day basis. You’ll also be offered accessible guidelines for adapting treatment and including other professionals. Information and tips from this Webinar will help you become “trauma-wise” even if you are not specifically trauma-trained.

Eating Disorder Treatment: Choosing Levels of Care

About the Speakers

Dr. Wendy Oliver-Pyatt, MD, FAED, CEDS, a psychiatrist with over 20 years of experience, is known for her belief that treatment of eating disorders should be delivered in a healing environment with strong medical and psychological care, and where a deep connection and understanding can unfold with each patient. Her oversight of patient care is based on the fundamental principal that within each individual is the capacity to recover when provided with attuned, compassionate, and scientifically grounded treatment. Dr. Joel Jahraus, well-known and respected for his two decades of specialization in the medical management of patients with eating disorders, joined the team at Oliver-Pyatt Centers in May 2012 as Medical Director. A board-certified physician for over 30 years, he is a recognized expert on diabetes and the medical complications of eating disorders. Prior to OliverPyatt Centers, Dr. Jahraus served as Executive Director of Park Nicollet-Melrose Institute in Minneapolis, MN where he both oversaw programming and direct management of patient care. His long and successful association with Melrose Institute (formerly The Eating Disorders Institute) began in 1992. In addition to his considerable experience with hospital-based programs, he also served as Medical Director of Remuda Treatment Centers in Wickenburg, AZ from 2002-2004 where he worked with residential and outpatient levels of care. Dr. Jahraus graduated from Washington University Medical School in St. Louis, Missouri and spent his early career in family medicine. He began his academic career as Associate Director of the University of Minnesota Family Residency Program before serving as the Pre-Doctoral Director at the University of Minnesota Medical School. During his teaching career at the University of Minnesota Medical School, Dr. Jahraus received the Distinguished Teacher of the Year Award. He co-authored a chapter on eating disorders in the Textbook of Psychosomatic Medicine, published by the American Psychiatric Association and has been featured in various national media, including two public television documentaries on eating disorders. He has also testified before Congress on the need for health insurance coverage for eating disorder treatment. For his outstanding contributions to the field, he received the prestigious Ellis Island Medal of Honor in 2011

About the Topic

The presenters will review the APA (American Psychiatric Association) guidelines that are most commonly cited by eating disorder treatment professionals when dealing with insurance reviews. They will critique these guidelines and show that sometimes they are not specific enough and therefore do not support the argument eating disorder professionals wish to make. Then the presenters will discuss how quite a few insurance companies have their own proprietary guidelines that are very different than the APA guidelines. Many providers aren’t aware of the nuances of those proprietary guidelines and how to deal with them. Finally, they will review clinical scenarios and discuss how decisions are made from a practical and clinically grounded perspective. They will flesh out the different levels of care and discuss the role of each level in the restoration of a patient’s health. They will also discuss how you can tell when to send a patient to another level of care, such as an IOP, hospital, etc.

Sexuality and Eating Disorders: Living in the Female Body from the Inside Out or the Outside in?

About the Speakers

Dr. Miller is a clinical psychologist in private practice for 25 years in NYC. She is on the faculty of The Women’s Therapy Centre Institute where she supervises and teaches a therapeutic approach to working with eating problems based on the model of attuned eating developed by Susie Orbach. She is also a graduate of the NYU Postdoctoral Program in Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis. She received her PhD from George Washington University and completed training in sex therapy at Downstate Medical Center. She has been trained in Sue Johnson’s Emotionally Focused Couples Therapy. Her passionate interest in working with sexuality and couples stems from an appreciation of the difficulty of sexual and emotional connection for many individuals and from a deep belief in the healing potential of relationship. Her approach draws from relational, cultural, psychodynamic and feminist principles. In addition, Dr. Miller is interested in working with couples where there is substance use/misuse that is causing distress to one or both of the partners. She is developing a model of how to work with these couples from a harm reduction perspective. Lisa Thaler, LCSW has maintained a private psychotherapy practice in New York City since 1991. She received her BA from Amherst College, her MSW from New York University, and completed her post-graduate Psychoanalytic training at The Women’s Therapy Centre Institute. She specializes in the treatment of eating disorders, treating individuals, couples and families, and provides supervision for other clinicians. In addition to her private practice, Lisa has led eating disorder groups for New York University’s Counseling Center and The Women’s Therapy Centre Institute. She served as one of the original, primary therapists for The Renfrew Center of New York’s Intensive Outpatient Program when it opened in 1994. She is a faculty member of the Women’s Therapy Centre Institute’s one year post graduate program entitled “Eating and The Body: A Cultural, Relational Psychoanalytic Framework”.

About the Topic

“We will present a brief overview of the self-attuned eating model and how to use it in the psychodynamic treatment of eating and body image problems. We will discuss the sexual issues we see arise in this particular population and how to understand these issues from psychological, biological and sociocultural perspectives. Finally, we will discuss how to address and explore these issues in treatment.”