2011-2012 Recordings

You can purchase any of the following webinar recordings for $25.

 

Keys to a More Powerful Therapy with 21st Century Dysregulated Teens and Young Adults

About the Speaker

Dr. Ron Taffel is one of the country’s leading experts in working with teens, young adults and families. He is the author of eight books and over a hundred articles on psychotherapy, contemporary family life, adolescents and young adulthood. Dr. Taffel has done professional and parent workshops nationwide, training thousands of clinicians in teaching institutes, community agencies and private practice. His presentations have been featured in The New York Times and numerous TV and radio programs including NPR, 20/20, Dateline, and The Today Show. Dr. Taffel is Chair of the Institute for Contemporary Psychotherapy (ICP) in New York City. His latest professional book is “Breaking Through to Teens: Psychotherapy for the New Adolescence”

About the Topic

What characterizes 21st century development is the replacement of a vertical,intergenerational struggle over hierarchy, boundaries and individuation (which I and many of us were taught) by a horizontal, multi-directional tension between everyday fragmentation and elusive connection. Because ‘the center no longer holds’ for self and family life, therapists need to reconceptualize problems in body image and eating as disorders of self-regulation. And we must learn how to create a treatment relationship that speaks directly to our postmodern patients – young adults with very different sensibilities than we may have or our 20th century theories taught us. This workshop describes how the new, non-hierarchical family, internalization of the Internet, random hooking up as well as emerging patterns in substance use – all intensify disturbances in eating and other self-regulatory (e.g. anxiety, mood and acting-out) disorders. In this ‘unbound’ world no clinical orientation or protocol can succeed without, at its core, a treatment relationship that is able to hold today’s dysregulated young patients in ways that match their sensibilities. Dr. Taffel will offer key clinical techniques to build such a relationship, one that can foster a client’s self-regulation, countering the intense loss of control and disengagement that is so real for many 21st century teens and young adults.

 

Trauma and Eating Disorders: Essentials for Clinicians to Know (And Do!)

About the Speaker

Susan Schulherr, LCSW, a licensed clinical social worker, has lived and worked in New York City for over 30 years. In her private psychotherapy practice she has treated people with eating disorders and other problems of weight and eating for the last two decades. She has also provided extensive supervision and training for other clinicians. Susan is the author of the extremely well-received Eating Disorders for Dummies (Wiley, 2008). Her chapter on treating binge eating disorder appears in the 2005 book, EMDR Solutions: Pathways to Healing (Norton). Her article, “The Binge/Diet Cycle: Shedding New Light, Finding New Exits,” was published in Eating Disorders: The Journal of Treatment and Prevention (1998). Susan has presented workshops on eating disorders at the local and national levels. She has spoken extensively on various topics related to weight and eating to both professional and nonprofessional Susan graduated with honors from the University of Chicago and received a social work master’s degree from Columbia University. She was trained in the treatment of families and couples by Salvador Minuchin, MD, and received certification from his training institute. She also studied at the Center for the Study of Anorexia and Bulimia in New York City. Susan has extensive experience in the trauma specialty approaches of EMDR and Somatic experiencing, each of which she has adapted for the treatment of eating disorders.

About the Topic

The eating disorder client you see today, especially the difficult-to-treat client, has very likely experienced childhood trauma. There’s a good chance this involved relational trauma; that is, when caregivers failed to provide adequate protection, nurturing or stimulation during early development, and/or were a source of threat themselves.
Using a neurodevelopmental perspective, this webinar will explore:

  1. How childhood trauma affects the developing brain, and, in fact, all aspects of development
  2. How a trauma history makes a child vulnerable to the development of adult psychopathology, including eating disorders
  3. How eating disorder symptoms helped your clients adapt and survive, though at a very high cost
  4. The why’s and how’s of trauma-informed treatment for your eating disordered clients, incorporating recent developments in the fields of neuropsychiatry and the so-called body-based approaches


 

Eating Disorders and Men: What’s the Big Difference?

About the Speaker

Kent Jarratt, LCSW (www.kentjarratt.com) is a supervisor for CSAB. He has maintained an independent practice for 25 years. In addition to psychodynamic psychotherapy, with a specialty in eating disorders, he is also a hypnotherapist, and is the former President of the NY Milton H. Erickson Society for Psychotherapy and Hypnosis, and a former Director of the National Institute for the Psychotherapies Hypnotherapy Service. He is an adjunct lecturer in both the Social Work School and the Mental Health Counseling Program at Hunter College/CUNY. In 2011, he was invited to give the Greta Singer Memorial Lecture at Monmouth University, NJ. He has done extensive work with clients with eating disorders whose gender identity and expression is male. He has been a clinical consultant for several youth programs, including the YMCA of greater New York, The Hetrick-Martin Institute, and the LGBT Center of NYC.

About the Topic

Any discussion of eating disorders and those clients, whose gender identity and expression is male, will include theory building. Why? Because there is so little written about this population beyond the anecdotal; however, in my experience, two themes emerge. One, eating disorders are more often hidden or ignored in this population. Secondly, the question must be raised as to whether or not there are any substantive differences in the treatment of eating disorders between the genders. Together, we’ll enlarge upon our ideas of what is different about men and eating disorders, and how to work effectively with them.

 

Working on a Treatment TEAM WITH Patients with Eating Disorders: How Continuity of Care Can Foster Continuity of Self

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About the Topic

How Continuity of Care Can Foster Continuity of Self: I cannot imagine working with people with eating disorders without the help of a unified treatment team. Working together, we provide a “balanced meal” for patients who are afraid to “take in” the help that we can provide. Whenever possible, clients can play a special role on the team, and working with them in a collaborative fashion can help them to develop their own voice and to appreciate their own value.

 

The Role of Nutrition in Eating Disorder Treatment & Recovery: Finding Neutrality with Food (and Your Body)

About the Speaker

Melainie Rogers is a registered dietitian and founder of Melainie Rogers Nutrition LLC, a private group nutrition counseling practice in Manhattan, New York. She is also the founder and executive director of BALANCE eating disorder treatment center™. Her specialties include eating disorders, weight management and gastric bypass surgery counseling. Seeing a need for more services in New York City, Melainie has expanded her counseling practice with BALANCE eating disorder treatment center™ which offers an Intensive Outpatient Program (IOP), Saturday IOP, and a Day Treatment Program coming in Spring 2013. It is her hope and desire to better serve the needs of our clients who suffer with eating disorders and disordered eating, to help them find relief from their symptoms, and a better life balance in their recovery.
Melainie received her Bachelor’s degree in Biochemistry from Melbourne University and a Graduate Diploma in Sports Nutrition from Deakin University, Australia. Her Master of Science Degree in Clinical Nutrition was obtained from New York University. Melainie completed a rigorous internship in clinical nutrition at New York University Medical Center. She worked extensively in obesity research at the St Luke’s / Roosevelt Obesity Research Center, developed the nutrition component of the Beth Israel Medical Center weight loss surgery program, and counseled clients for weight management, and eating disorders with Joy Bauer Nutrition before establishing her own private practice and eating disorder treatment center.
She is the current President of the International Association of Eating Disorder Professionals (iaedp), NYC Chapter, and Chapter Representative on the National iaedp Executive Board.

About the Topic

Finding Neutrality with Food (and Your Body): The overall goal with nutrition therapy in the treatment of eating disorders is to help the client move towards a more neutral relationship with food (and their body). This presentation will outline some of the key methods we utilize in outpatient individual treatment sessions. It will also look at some of the common challenges that are experienced along the way and some specific techniques and approaches to counter those challenges.
Establishing a more neutral relationship with food requires the “legalizing” of all foods, challenging black and white thinking, encouraging the consumption of ALL foods irrespective of their “nutritional value”, reducing emotional choices around food, and reconnecting the client with their body and their internal regulatory system of hunger, fullness and satiety.

 

Psychiatry in the Treatment of Eating Disorders Using a Treatment Team Model Approach (No Recording Available)

About the Speaker

Dr. Carol Zale holds a BA with honors in Literature from the University of Pennsylvania, a Post Baccalaureate Premedical Certificate from Columbia University and an M.D. from The Mount Sinai School of Medicine. She completed her psychiatry residency at Mount Sinai as well as an NIMH-funded clinical research fellowship in the psychopharmacology of mood and personality disorders. While a fellow, Dr. Zale also consulted regularly on the care of individuals with serious psychiatric illness and a history of violent offenses at the Pilgrim State Psychiatric Hospital. As an Attending Physician in the outpatient psychiatry program at Mount Sinai, Dr. Zale she was both a clinician utilizing the split care model of treatment and a clinic supervisor of psychiatry residents.
In 1997 Dr. Zale opened her private practice in psychotherapy and psychopharmacology in New York City, where she treats late adolescents and adults who have a variety of psychiatric and medical issues, including those of eating disorders. Dr. Zale greatly enjoys teaching and mentoring others. At Mount Sinai she co-taught an elective for medical students in Medicine in Literature, and she developed and taught a course in Psychopharmacology for the non-M.D. Therapist at the Institute for Contemporary Psychotherapy (ICP). She has also taught candidates at the Center for the study of Anorexia and Bulimia (CSAB) on the psychiatrist’s role in treating eating disorders and has taught as well on the topic of suicide. Dr. Zale’s other professional activities include mentoring graduating psychiatrists who wish to start their own private practice in psychiatry as a volunteer for the Medical Society of the State of New York, member of the Advisory Board for CSAB, and she has previously served on the boards of Caring at Columbia and the Zale Foundation. She is the recipient of a Ralph Kaufman prize in Psychiatry at Mount Sinai, Spotlight Award at Mount Sinai and a Red Cross award of distinction. Dr. Zale is the author of several publications in her field as well as being a published poet.

About the Topic

Eating Disorders are often chronic and feature a waxing and waning course throughout the life cycle including long periods which may be completely symptom free. For the psychiatrist, it is often other accompanying illnesses such as mood disorders, personality disorders and anxiety disorders that include obsessive compulsive symptoms and also ironically substance dependence, which require psychopharmacological treatment. The role of the psychiatrist in the treatment of eating disorders varies depending on the treatment setting–inpatient, IOP, or outpatient. Whatever the setting, however, the psychiatrist is ideally just one member of a cohesive treatment team which includes the active participation of a non-MD therapist(s), nutritionist and a pediatrician or internist, all of whom have a special facility in the treatment of eating disorders. This talk will explore the available psychopharmacology for eating disorders, a look toward psychopharmacology which may be available to treat eating disorders in the future, and the role of the psychiatrist in the treatment team.

 

Medical Issues in Eating Disorders

About the Speaker

Dr. Karen Rosewater is a graduate of Yale University and the Yale University School of Medicine. She completed her residency in pediatrics at Boston Children’s Hospital-Harvard Medical School, and a fellowship in adolescent medicine at Boston Children’s and Children’s National Medical Center in Washington, D.C., and received a Masters in Public Health from George Washington University. Since finishing her fellowship, Dr. Rosewater has been working as a physician in a private practice, AYAM (Adolescent-Young Adult Medicine) in New York City where she cares for pre-teens, teenagers and young adults providing primary care and specialized care, including the treatment of eating disorders. Dr. Rosewater is the recipient of several prestigious honors, including membership in the AOA Medical Honor Society, and for outstanding work in research, teaching and community service. She is on the advisory boards of the Center for the Study of Anorexia and Bulimia (CSAB), the New York Chapter of IAEDP (International Association of Eating Disorder Professionals) and the Churchill School, and previously served a term on the advisory board of the Renfrew Center of New York and is a member of the Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine (SAHM).

About the Topic

Eating disorders can lead to significant problems with all of the body’s organ systems. This talk will address the myriad of medical signs and symptoms that may arise in eating disorders, highlighting serious issues and sometimes more subtle complications that can occur, including refeeding syndrome. Special attention will be given to evaluation of medical stability and will cover recommended testing in the context of the eating disorder patient and their symptoms. The role of the medical provider within the treatment team in terms of physiological assessment and evaluation, monitoring throughout treatment and patient education will be discussed.

 

Eating Disorders in Athletes

About the Speaker

>strong>Dr. Hildebrandt graduated with a degree in psychology from Vanderbilt University in 2000 and completed his doctorate in Clinical Psychology in 2005 from Rutgers University. He obtained a concentration in Sport Psychology. After completing his graduate degree, he began his post-doctoral training at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine working in the Eating and Weight Disorders Program. His clinical and research interests have remained focused on the development, maintenance, and treatment of appearance and performance enhancing drug abuse. Other clinical and research interests include treatment of females with alcohol use disorders, gender differences in the eating and weight disorders, and the neuroendocrinology of these disease states. He has received grants from the National Institute of Drug Abuse, the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, and National Institute of Mental Health, and National Institute on Child Health and Human Development. Dr. Hildebrandt maintains an outpatient clinic servicing these populations across the lifespan. He is an active clinician, specializing in cognitive behavior therapy, couples therapy, and family based therapy for these disorders.

About the Topic

This talk will cover some of the primary issues faced by clinicians, high school and college professionals when treating eating disorders with athletic populations. Special attention will be given to gender differences in this context and the under-recognized problem of appearance and performance enhancing drug use. The role of fitness supplements and weight loss/diet pills in eating disorder and body image disturbance will be discussed.

 

Putting Research into Practice: How to provide the best treatments for clients with Eating Disorders and their loved ones

About the Speaker

Judith Banker, MA, LLP, FAED is the Founder and Executive Director of the Center for Eating Disorders, a non-profit support and outpatient treatment facility in Ann Arbor, Michigan established in 1983. She lectures internationally on strategies to bridge research and practice in the field of eating disorders and on the treatment of eating disorders including the integration of psychodynamic and behavioral therapies, the role of the therapeutic alliance, and the application of Family Based Therapy (FBT). Her publications and research address a range of topics related to eating disorders treatment and research and practice integration. She is Past President and a Fellow of the Academy for Eating Disorders.

About the Topic

How to provide the best treatments for clients with Eating Disorders and their loved ones: This seminar will offer clinicians an overview of the current research findings on effective treatments for eating disorders, including anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder in children and adolescents, and adults. An 8-step plan will be presented for how treatment professionals can access and use the research literature to improve the quality of their practice. Included in this plan are simple strategies clinicians can utilize to hone their clinical observation skills and simple measures clinicians can implement to assess and communicate treatment outcomes and effectiveness. Case vignettes will be presented to demonstrate these strategies.

 

Food, Feelings, Families and Holidays

About the Speaker

Judith Ruskay Rabinor, Ph.D. is a clinical psychologist who specializes in the treatment of eating disorders. She is the Founder and Director of the American Eating Disorders Center of Long Island, is an Associate Professor of Psychology at Adelphi University in Garden City, author of A Starving Madness, and is Editor of “The Therapist’s Voice” in Eating Disorders: The Journal of Treatment and Prevention. She has lectured at numerous national and international conferences, co-hosted a weekly radio show, and has appeared on Oprah and other television shows.

About the Topic

There is much controversy regarding the role of parents when a teenager or child has an eating-disorder. While it is generally agreed that all parents need to be involved with their eating-disordered child or teen, especially at holiday time– the question is how. There are always many specific things families can do regarding boundaries, communication and the rights and responsibility of all family members to set the stage for the possibility of recovery. Informed by relational theory, this webinar will offer concrete suggestions and tools as to how a therapist best guides sufferers and parents.

 

What’s Weight Got to Do with It?: An Introduction to HAES in Psychotherapy

About the Speaker

Dr. Deb Burgard is a psychologist specializing in women’s issues, particularly eating and weight concerns, relationships, and sexuality. She also works with members of the LGBTI community. In her efforts to change the cultural pressures that create body image distress, she created the award-winning Body Positive website and is one of the founders of the Health at Every Size (HAES) model, both of which focus on developing workable and lasting health practices and a peaceful, positive partnership with one’s body throughout life. She is experienced working with people across the weight spectrum that have had a long and troubled history with establishing physical activity, adequate nutrition and sleep, and social support in their lives. She has also been active in helping outpatient clinicians from different disciplines work as teams to add power and consistency to our interventions, and helping the teams work in concert with families, partners, and caregivers.

Dr. Burgard co-chairs the Academy for Eating Disorders’ Health at Every Size SIG, sits on the review board of the Journal of Fat Studies, and serves as an advisor to the Association for Size Diversity and Health and The National Association to Advance Fat Acceptance. She wrote, Great Shape: The First Fitness Guide for Women as well as “What’s Weight Got to do with it? Weight Neutrality in the Health at Every Size Paradigm,” Treatment of Eating Disorders (Maine et al., 2010), “Developing Body Trust,” Effective Clinical Practice in the Treatment of Eating Disorders (Maine et al., 2009), “What is Health at Every Size?” in The Fat Studies Reader (Rothblum and Solovay, 2009) and “Alternatives in Obesity Treatment” in Feminist Approaches to Eating Disorders (Fallon et al., 1994). She co-authored the Academy for Eating Disorder’s Guidelines for Childhood Obesity Prevention Programs. She co-founded the Sustainable Health Practices Registry to gather data on the ways people have found to create lasting health habits. She was educated at Harvard University and the Wright Institute (Berkeley, CA).

About the Topic

The “War on Obesity” has only served to amplify the anxiety and distress about weight of many, if not most, of our patients and clients. Even when disordered eating and body image distress is not the focus of treatment, it can be a source of “everyday discontent” for young and adult women and increasingly, boys and men. People are confused about what normal eating is and very few people feel they can trust their own bodies as partners in making decisions about food.
We will introduce participants to the “Health at Every Size” model, which helps people focus on developing sustainable daily practices that support their health, like intuitive eating and pleasurable physical activity, adequate sleep, and strengthening social bonds. Healing the distrust of our bodies is at the center of the model. The HAES model also locates the sources of people’s distress partly in cultural forces like weight stigma, and thus directs us as clinicians to help our clients with stereotype management skills, developing a theory of why they are experiencing distressing or even traumatizing events, and for those clients who find it empowering, supporting their activism in challenging weight stigma.
We will also look at the weight biases that we clinicians bring with us to our work and how to identify our own beliefs and behaviors. We are all raised to associate negative attributes with fatness, and these associations are important to bring to awareness so we may be more intentional. Our bodies are salient to our clients and have meaning as well, no matter our size. So we are assigning meaning to our clients’ bodies, they are assigning meaning to ours, and all of this tends to be unspoken but very important in influencing the work of psychotherapy.

 

Putting It All Together: An Integrative Approach to the Treatment of Eating Disorders

About the Speaker

F. Diane Barth, LCSW, is a psychotherapist and psychoanalyst in private practice in New York City. She works with adults and adolescents, individuals and families and has been working with college students with eating disorders since 1981. She received a master’s degree from Columbia University School of Social Work and analytic certification from the Psychoanalytic Institute of the Postgraduate Center. Her articles have been published in the Clinical Social Work Journal, Psychoanalytic Dialogues, Psychoanalytic Psychology, and other professional journals, and as chapters in numerous books. Her book, Daydreaming: Unlock the Creative Power of Your Mind, was published by Viking/Penguin. She runs private study groups in New York City and workshops for therapists around the country and has taught several online courses. Her blog “Off the Couch” can be found at psychologytoday.com. She is also the Editor of the Special Edition of The Clinical Social Work Journal on “Integrating Theories in Clinical Social Work” June 2011.

About the Topic

Recent research has confirmed what therapists have known: eating disorder symptoms have roots in a variety of sources, including psychological, historical/familial, and biological/genetic/physiological. Given this multiplicity of causes, it makes sense that effective treatment would combine a variety of different approaches. Yet how do we choose what techniques to use with each client? And can we integrate ideas and interventions without muddying the waters of the therapeutic work?
Ms. Barth will present an approach that helps a client build a new secure attachment relationship while simultaneously making significant behavioral changes. Drawing from a wide range of psychodynamic, structural and behavioral theories, and from the rich integrative work of Wachtel and Connors, Ms. Barth will utilize clinical illustrations and clear theoretical explanations to explain her approach. The issue of resistance will also be addressed.

 
Questions and clinical material from webinar participants are encouraged and can be submitted prior to or during the presentation.