2010-2011 Recordings

You can purchase any of the following webinar recordings for $25.

 

Eating Disorders: Separation and Individuation in Adolescents & Young Adults

About the Speaker

F. Diane Barth, LCSW, is a psychotherapist and psychoanalyst in private practice in New York City. She works with adults and adolescents, individuals and families and has been working with college students with eating disorders since 1981. She received a master’s degree from Columbia University School of Social Work and analytic certification from the Psychoanalytic Institute of the Postgraduate Center. Her articles have been published in the Clinical Social Work Journal, Psychoanalytic Dialogues, Psychoanalytic Psychology, and other professional journals, and as chapters in numerous books. Her book, Daydreaming: Unlock the Creative Power of Your Mind, was published by Viking/Penguin. She runs private study groups in New York City and workshops for therapists around the country and has taught several online courses. Her blog “Off the Couch” can be found at psychologytoday.com. She is also the Editor of the Special Edition of The Clinical Social Work Journal on “Integrating Theories in Clinical Social Work” June 2011.

About the Topic

Saying “Goodbye” – Eating Disorders and Separation in College Students. It sometimes seems that the college experience is tailor-made for the development of eating disorders. Overwhelmed and bombarded by their feelings, college students often turn to behavioral means, like eating disorders, to cope. For college students, many of these feelings are directly linked to the separation process. Our culture is so focused on independence that many parents and professionals do not recognize the importance of parents maintaining contact with their college students. In this discussion Diane Barth will talk about eating disorders as a way that college students attempt to negotiate separation and connection, dependence and autonomy.

Eating Disorders as a strategy for dealing with Traumatic Memory

About the Speaker

A graduate of the Harvard Law School, Rosemary Master’s first professional experience was in criminal justice administration at the Vera Institute of Justice where she assisted in the development of alternatives to incarceration for mentally ill offenders.
Work on problems related to mental illness drew Rosemary to the practice of psychotherapy. She obtained a degree in social work and joined the staff of the Victim Services Agency where she developed and ran the first program in the United States for families of homicide victims.
Currently, Rosemary is the Director of the Trauma Studies Center of the Institute for Contemporary Psychotherapy in New York City.

About the Topic

This workshop will review the neurobiological consequences of psychological trauma and how those consequences impact a person’s capacity for affect regulation and healthy attachment. The role of eating disorders in fending off emotional, physical and sensory re-experiencing of trauma will be reviewed as will clinical approaches that address both a client’s eating disorder and trauma history.

“How to Avoid Common Pitfalls in the treatment of the Eating Disordered Patient” with Judith Ruskay Rabinor, PhD

About the Speaker

Judith Ruskay Rabinor, Ph.D. is a clinical psychologist who specializes in the treatment of eating disorders. She is the Founder and Director of the American Eating Disorders Center of Long Island, is an Associate Professor of Psychology at Adelphi University in Garden City, author of A Starving Madness, and is Editor of “The Therapist’s Voice” in Eating Disorders: The Journal of Treatment and Prevention. She has lectured at numerous national and international conferences, co-hosted a weekly radio show, and has appeared on Oprah and other television shows.

About the Topic

Any discussion of eating disorders and those clients, whose gender identity and expression is male, will include theory building. Why? Because there is so little written about this population beyond the anecdotal; however, in my experience, two themes emerge. One, eating disorders are more often hidden or ignored in this population. Secondly, the question must be raised as to whether or not there are any substantive differences in the treatment of eating disorders between the genders. Together, we’ll enlarge upon our ideas of what is different about men and eating disorders, and how to work effectively with them.